USER GUIDELINES
for Equestrian Shared-Use Segments
of the Confederation Trail


 **Caring for the safety and well-being of our fellow human-beings out on the trail**

Click here for Government of PEI Pilot Project website.

Guidelines for Equestrians on the Confederation Trail :

 The use of ASTM/SEI certified helmets is required.

 Riding will be permitted on the trail from a half hour after sunrise to a half hour before sunset.

 Ensure that you are in control of your horse. Before ever setting hoof on the trail, be certain your horse is prepared by gradually exposing him/her, in a safe environment, to the sights and sounds s/he may encounter when meeting other trail users. (Examples include strollers, dogs, cyclists, umbrellas, walking sticks, backpacks, and children). Less experienced horses and riders should travel behind “trail wise” horses and riders. Novice and first-time riders are reminded that a multi-use trail is not the correct place to learn how to ride.

 At trail heads, park considerately. Secure horses safely when tacking up.

 Be polite, respectful, and considerate of other trail enthusiasts. Many non-equestrians are unfamiliar with horses, and may be intimidated by them, or may be unaware of how to behave near horses. When directing other users on what to do to keep everyone safe, be a courteous ambassador for the equestrian community.

 Travel only at the walk or trot. Cantering and galloping are prohibited.

 When meeting or passing other users, do so in single file, at the walk. Greeting other users will encourage them to speak, which will in turn be reassuring to your horse.

 Stay to the right when meeting other users. Pass on the left. Be prepared to politely let other trail enthusiasts know what needs to happen to keep you, the horse, and other users safe when meeting on the trail.

 Do not leave manure on the main trail tread. You may not mind the sight and smell of horse manure, but your fellow trail enthusiasts do. Dismount and kick manure off the tread, and into the ditch if you can. If you are unable to safely/easily mount and dismount on the trail, use a manure catcher bag. 

 Stay on the trail, and do not trespass onto private property.

 At road crossings, stop and yield to vehicles. You will find barriers in place at road crossings: you may either ride safely through, or dismount and lead your horse. Watch you don’t catch a stirrup on the barriers!

 At least one person in the party should carry a cell phone in case of emergency.

 Be alert, and pay attention to your horse. Do not wear earbuds or headphones, which make it difficult to hear and communicate with other users.

 Larger groups are encouraged to disperse into smaller pods of 5 riders or fewer.

 Please leave your dog at home. Dogs must be on leash and it is difficult to hold a leash and ride a horse

 Do not litter.

 Do not consume alcohol on the trail.

 Do not tie your horse to structures encountered on the trail. Do not leave your horse unattended.

 Never take a loose horse on the trail.

 Children under the age of 14 must be accompanied by an adult. Ponying of young children is not recommended.

 Horse-drawn vehicles are not allowed on the Confederation Trail.

 Membership in Island Horse Council or your provincial sporting organization, or the carrying of similar liability insurance is strongly recommended.

         **Please note that pilot areas will be temporarily closed to horses after severe weather events to prevent damage on the trail.

         **If you would like guidance with preparing your horse for the trail, please do not hesitate to contact PEI Trail Riders at info@peitrailriders.ca

        **Consider volunteering your time as a trail monitor – we are all stewards of the Trail! If you would like to volunteer time as an equestrian trail monitor, please get in touch with us at the above email address.

Guidelines for Cyclists meeting horses:

 When you see a horse approaching, slow down and pull as far to the right side of the trail as possible. Greet the rider in a friendly, relaxed tone: horses are reassured by the sound of your voice. If requested to do so by the rider, stop, or better yet, offer to do so.

 When approaching a horse from behind, call out, or ring your bell to alert the rider to your presence. Do not pass unless the rider has acknowledged you. Pass slowly, on the left, giving the horse as much room as possible. If requested to do so by the rider, please dismount and walk your bicycle past. Alternatively, the rider may request that you stop, and may prefer to walk the horse past you so that they are behind you.

 Be polite, respectful, and considerate when encountering horseback riders.

 If you are wearing earbuds or headphones, remove them when encountering a horse – otherwise, it will be difficult to effectively communicate, which will put everyone at risk.

 Avoid loud noises or sudden movements, which may be startling to horses.


Guidelines for Hikers, Runners, and Wheelchair Users Meeting Horses:

 When you see a horse approaching, move as far to the right side of the trail as possible. Greet the rider in a friendly, relaxed tone: horses are reassured by the sound of your voice.

 When approaching a horse from behind, call out. Do not pass unless the rider has acknowledged you. Pass on the left, giving the horse as much room as possible.

 If you are wearing earbuds or headphones, remove them when encountering a horse – otherwise, it will be difficult to effectively communicate, which will put everyone at risk.

 Avoid loud noises or sudden movements, which may be startling to horses.

 Be polite, respectful, and considerate when encountering horseback riders.

 If a rider requests that you stop, please do. The rider knows his or her horse, and how to best handle a situation safely.

 If you are enjoying the trail with your dog, please ensure that your pet is leashed around horses. 

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